Apply Now For The Targeted Youth Employability Support Initiative (TYESI)

The aim of the Targeted Youth Employability Support Initiative (TYESI) is to engage and support the harder to reach young people aged 15 to 24 years who are not currently in employment, education, or training.

Click here to download the TYESI Application Form.

Completed applications must be returned to Denise Cummins denisecummins@ddletb.ie no later than Friday 17th September 2020

TYESI Guidance Document

More information about TYESI

The focus of the initiative is on soft skills and developing these in relation to employability. It is to assist young people to attain a level of confidence and agency to engage in currently available programmes or services, for example, Youthreach.

Short focussed interventions are to provide community-based support to young people to attain a level of confidence and agency to engage in a wide range of currently available progression routes to further education and training programmes and/or employment.

The successful applicants will be expected to work with ‘hard to reach’ cohorts of young people. A certain amount of flexibility is available to organisations in the design and content of their proposed programmes/actions under the Initiative. Good governance and evaluation must be part of the approach being proposed.

Objectives:

The objectives of the Targeted Youth Employability Support Initiative (TYESI) are as follows:

1. Engage young people in the TYESI target group focusing on their support needs to develop their personal and social development outcomes, preparing them for onward progression to further education, training and/or employment.

2. Provide safe, welcoming, non-judgemental spaces.

3. Provide quality, evidence-based interventions that respond to the needs of the target group/needs identified by the ETB which operate from a process of ongoing review and monitoring.

4. Implement a range of methods including but not limited to small group work, large group work, one to one, coaching and mentoring, outreach in the recruitment of and engagement with young people throughout the programme.

5. As far as is practical, involve young people in the development, delivery and evaluation of the interventions under the TYESI.

6. Proposals must clearly demonstrate additionality to and non-duplication of existing services.

7. Communicate and collaborate with all stakeholders to achieve the best possible outcomes for young people.

Target Group & Needs:

The target group for the TYESI is young people between the ages of 15 and 24 (inclusive), who are not currently in employment, education, or training. In particular applicants should consider the following in presenting their proposals:

• Young people experiencing economic disadvantage

• Young people who live in communities with higher than average levels of youth unemployment or intergenerational unemployment,

• Young people experiencing marginalisation or are at risk of not flourishing, have little or no formal structure in their lives, or are experiencing significant isolation from their community or peers.

 

Click here to download the TYESI Application Form.

Completed applications must be returned to Denise Cummins denisecummins@ddletb.ie  

 no later than  Friday 17th September 2020 

TYESI Guidance Document

 

Mitigating Against Educational Disadvantage

Mitigating Against Educational Disadvantage Fund (MaEDF) 2021– Call For Applications

Following the success of projects funded through the Mitigating against Educational Disadvantage Fund (MaEDF) in 2020, we are pleased to advise that €10 million in funding to support a new open call has been confirmed for 2021. Please note the closing date for applications is Monday 13th September

Mitigating Against Educational Disadvantage

The Mitigating Against Educational Disadvantage Fund (MaEDF) aims to provide funding to support educationally disadvantaged learners in accessing and participating in community education. The fund was launched by Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science Simon Harris TD, and is administered by SOLAS, the further education and training authority, and the 16 local Education and Training Boards.

DDLETB is now inviting applications from Community Education providers for funding from Mitigating Educational Disadvantage Fund 2021.

This fund places a strong focus on

  • Community Education as a mechanism to continue to support and engage with disadvantaged learners
  • Reaching out, encouraging and supporting learners to re-engage with further education and training
  • Enticing new learners to engage with further education and training opportunities
  • Enabling the investment in building the digital infrastructure of providers, and their capability to ensure that online learning can be delivered in a way that meets the complex needs of learners.

Categories eligible for funding consideration are:

  • Digital Technologies – Supply of devices, software and systems, or CPD training, to facilitate high quality learning and delivery.
  • Learner Assistance Fund to help, where appropriate, with costs associated with course participation, such as: books and class materials.
  • Outreach, Engagement and Mentoring Fund to assist with costs associated with activities such as awareness raising, and services to promote re-engagement
  • COVID-19 Recovery Exceptional Circumstances Fund for Community Education to address educationally disadvantaged learners

 

Administration of the MAEDF grant

Funds are allocated by SOLAS to DDLETB, who is responsible for the administration and management of funding within its region.

Expenditure

Approved funding allocation for any activity under the MAEDF must:

(a) Be used for the specific purpose intended

(b) All expenditure to be completed by 2021 year-end

(c) Not to be used for any pay costs or costs of a recruiting nature

 

Application Forms & Guidelines

Click here for the DDLETB External Application Form MaEDF 2021

Click here for the MAEDF 2021 ETB Guidelines

 

Closing Date: Monday 13th September

Contact aedinotoole@ddletb.ie for more information

The fund was first made available in 2020 with over 500 community education projects funded through the 16 Education and Training Boards. The projects funded varied from projects to help support online leaning, connect communities and providing social supports to the most disadvantaged.

Click here to watch the Youtube video

DDLETB Text 50808

Text 50808 For When You Need To Talk

DDLETB Text 50808

DDLETB has become a keyword partner with Text 50808, a free 24/7 anonymous text support service.

50808 provides everything from a calming chat to immediate support for people going through a mental health or emotional crisis – big or small. From breakups or bullying, to anxiety, depression and suicidal feelings, Crisis Volunteers are available 24/7 for anonymous text conversations.

Text ‘ETB’ to 50808 to be connected with a trained volunteer.  50808 aims to provide immediate support in the short term and connect people to resources that will help them in the future.

For more information please visit: https://text50808.ie/

 

DDLETB-Text-50808-Irish

Tá DDLETB ina chomhpháirtí eochairfhocal le Text 50808, seirbhís tacaíochta téacs gan ainm 24/7 saor in aisce.

Soláthraíonn 50808 gach rud ó chomhrá ceansaithe go tacaíocht láithreach do dhaoine atá ag dul trí ghéarchéim sláinte meabhrach nó mothúchánach – mór nó beag. Ó mhiondealuithe nó bulaíocht, go himní, dúlagar agus mothúcháin féinmharaithe, tá Oibrithe Deonacha Géarchéime ar fáil 24/7 le haghaidh comhráite téacs gan ainm.

Cuir téacs ‘ETB’ go 50808 le bheith ceangailte le saorálaí oilte. Tá sé mar aidhm ag 50808 tacaíocht láithreach a sholáthar sa ghearrthéarma agus daoine a nascadh le hacmhainní a chabhróidh leo sa todhchaí.

Le haghaidh tuilleadh faisnéise, téigh chuig: https://text50808.ie/

 

Ignite-2021-Youth-Development-Through-Sport

Ignite – Youth Development Through Sport

IGNITE is a super programme for people aged 18–24 years old with an interest in Sport. It’s a full-time course, Monday – Friday and a training allowance is provided. It takes place at Brookfield Youth & Community Centre in Tallaght, Dublin 24.

IGNITE is designed to engage young people by combining the key elements of sport, youth work and education. The programme will enable participants to gain the skills and confidence to return to education or further training or progress to employment by learning new skills that will help them progress on this pathway. It will also empower the young people to become more involved in sporting opportunities in their own local communities.

Ignite-2021-Youth-Development-Through-Sport

On completion of IGNITE young people will receive accreditation from at least five sporting bodies in a variety of sports, complete a QQI level 3 module in interviewing skills & have an increased awareness of key skills including communication, problem-solving & teamwork.

The young people participating in this programme will have an opportunity to learn and grow in a safe but challenging environment within their own community

Elements of IGNITE include:

Coaching Certificates

  • Soccer FAI – PDP-1
  • Mountaineering Ireland
    – Rock Climbing Indoor Assistant Cert
  • Leinster Rugby – Prime Coaching Cert
  • Kayaking skills- Level 2 Cert
  • Badminton – International certificate
  • Leinster Cricket – Coaching Certs
  • GAA – Foundation Cert
  • Orienteering Ireland Instructor Cert

Other Certificates

  • Sports First Aid
  • Child Protection Training
  • Disability Inclusion
  • QQI Module: Researching Interviewing Skills

Workshops

  • Mindfulness
  • Yoga
  • Pilates
  • Introduction to Fitness

To find out more about the exciting opportunity in sports development, Contact
Darren Bruton,
Sports Officer
DDLETB Youth & Sport
Development Services
Mobile 087 218 0941

Ignite-2021-Youth-Development-Through-Sport-FLYER

DDLETB - What Is A Community National School

What Are Community National Schools Anyway?

DDLETB is a proud patron of 7 Community National Schools and 3 Special Schools. They are:

Community National Schools

Citywest & Saggart Community National School
Lucan Community National School
Scoil Aoife Community National School
Scoil Choilm Community National School
Scoil Chormaic Community National School
Scoil Ghráinne Community National School
Rivervalley Community National School

Special Schools

Crannog Nua Special School
Portrane, Co. Dublin.

Ballydowd High Support Special School
Ballyowen, Dublin 22.

Danu Community Special School
c/o Hansfield Educate Together, Dublin 15.

But what exactly are Community National Schools and how are they different from what is generally known as a “Primary School”? Séamus Conboy is the Education and Training Boards Ireland Primary Schools Support Officer, and here he explains what they are.

Community National Schools have featured quite a lot in the media recently, and people have been asking this question: what exactly is a Community National School? The short answer is that they are State-operated, child-centred, inclusive, multi-belief primary schools.
Here are the answers to the other questions people are asking about Community National Schools.

What is a Community National School?

Community National Schools (CNS) are state-operated, multidenominational, inclusive schools that welcome all children from the local communities they serve. Historically, schools have been managed by private patrons who are also responsible for the ethos of the school e.g. Church bodies, Educate Together. The State has now developed its own primary school model with the Community National Schools.

DDLETB - What Is A Community National School

Why is there a need for a Community National School?

Ireland is changing. It used to be a significantly homogenous country with most people identifying as
Roman Catholic. The religious identity of many Irish people has changed in recent years. Ireland has
also morphed into a richly diverse country because of the migration experienced during the boom
years. Due to these changes, the current school system, which is 96% Church-run, no longer fully reflects
Irish society. Even with their best efforts, many Church-run schools are struggling to fully meet the needs of all of their children due to the constraints of their ethos.

Who is the patron of these schools?

The patrons of CNS schools are the Education and Training Boards (ETBs). ETBs, which were formerly
known as VECs, are statutory authorities which have responsibility for education and youth work. ETBs
manage and operate Community National Schools, Second-level schools such as Community Colleges
and a range of adult and further education centres. They have developed an excellent reputation for
their provision of inclusive, innovative education that meets the needs of the entire community.

What is the difference between Community National Schools and other school types?

Faced with a number of choices, parents can be comforted knowing that every school, regardless of its
patron, follows the same national curriculum. Schools mainly differ in what they call their ‘ethos’ or
characteristic spirit. Many parents describe a Community National School as somewhere between the
traditional denominational school and a secular school. Although Community National Schools do
not prioritise any one religion over another, space is made within the school day for children to be
nurtured in their own faith or secular belief while learning more about their friends’ beliefs too.
Although CNS schools pride themselves on their commitment to inclusion and equality for all, their
main commitment is to providing a child-centred education that helps children to live their lives to
the full. A focus on both academic and hands-on learning, IT and the nurturing of children’s well-being
ensures that they are prepared to thrive in and beyond their education journey.
CNS schools are progressive schools rooted in the best of tradition. CNS schools are similar to traditional
schools in that the children wear a school uniform and the teacher is referred to formally e.g. Mr. Murphy, Múinteoir Orla.
Community National Schools Ethos
CNS schools are similar to Educate Together schools in that they have inclusive enrolment policies which do not prioritise any one group over another, are multi-denominational and have equality central to their ethos.
Unique to each school type is what is known as their ‘Patron’s Programme’. This is done for 30 minutes a day and underpins the ethos of the school. In a Church-run school, it is a single faith formation programme. However, in a Community National School, it is a multi-belief and values education
programme called Goodness Me! Goodness You!

How do Community National Schools cater for religious/secular belief diversity?

Unlike single-denominational schools, Community National Schools have a multi-belief and values education programme that caters for children of all faiths and secular beliefs. The programme is called Goodness Me, Goodness You! or GMGY. This programme was developed by the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) which is the statutory body charged with the development of national curricula.

It is a belief-nurturing programme where children, with the help of their teacher, parents and belief
communities learn more about their own beliefs and those of their friends. Children learn together about
the same theme – the schools communicate with parents about the theme and they talk about it at home from their own faith/belief perspective. Children then share their perspective or experience of the same theme with their class and therefore learn more about themselves and each other.

Does the school support children preparing for special rites of passages e.g. the Sacraments?

Community National Schools also offer Belief Specific Teaching (BST) where parents can request additional supports around specific rites of passage. For example, many Catholic parents want some support from the school around the sacraments. The schools work with the parents and parish around how they can support them, bearing in mind the limitations they have as they are primarily multi-denominational schools. This support is open to all families from all religions and beliefs. It is different
in every Community National School, depending on the needs of the school community and the practices
of local belief communities.

Does the GMGY Programme deal with topics other than religions and beliefs?

The GMGY programme is also a values education programme. Children learn all about ethics and
the values of the school, such as equality and justice. They also do what is called ‘Thinking Time’
where the children learn to think critically and philosophically about different issues. A very nice part of
the programme is what is known as ‘Quiet Time’ where children are encouraged to fall still and think
about all that they have learnt that day in GMGY and to consider how that relates to their lives as
individuals.

Where are the current Community National Schools and how are they doing?

To date, there are 11 Community National Schools in Dublin, Wicklow, Meath, Kildare and Cork. Each CNS has thrived in the areas they are in and have developed reputations for their inclusive ethos and commitment to excellence in education.

Where can I find out more information about these schools?

For more information or to express an interest in enrolling your child in a new Community National School, please visit www.cns.ie. Each school has its own individual website that can be accessed from here. For more information on Goodness Me! Goodness You! please visit www.gmgy.ie.