DDLETB - What Is A Community National School

What Are Community National Schools Anyway?

DDLETB is a proud patron of 7 Community National Schools and 3 Special Schools. They are:

Community National Schools

Citywest & Saggart Community National School
Lucan Community National School
Scoil Aoife Community National School
Scoil Choilm Community National School
Scoil Chormaic Community National School
Scoil Ghráinne Community National School
Rivervalley Community National School

Special Schools

Crannog Nua Special School
Portrane, Co. Dublin.

Ballydowd High Support Special School
Ballyowen, Dublin 22.

Danu Community Special School
c/o Hansfield Educate Together, Dublin 15.

But what exactly are Community National Schools and how are they different from what is generally known as a “Primary School”? Séamus Conboy is the Education and Training Boards Ireland Primary Schools Support Officer, and here he explains what they are.

Community National Schools have featured quite a lot in the media recently, and people have been asking this question: what exactly is a Community National School? The short answer is that they are State-operated, child-centred, inclusive, multi-belief primary schools.
Here are the answers to the other questions people are asking about Community National Schools.

What is a Community National School?

Community National Schools (CNS) are state-operated, multidenominational, inclusive schools that welcome all children from the local communities they serve. Historically, schools have been managed by private patrons who are also responsible for the ethos of the school e.g. Church bodies, Educate Together. The State has now developed its own primary school model with the Community National Schools.

DDLETB - What Is A Community National School

Why is there a need for a Community National School?

Ireland is changing. It used to be a significantly homogenous country with most people identifying as
Roman Catholic. The religious identity of many Irish people has changed in recent years. Ireland has
also morphed into a richly diverse country because of the migration experienced during the boom
years. Due to these changes, the current school system, which is 96% Church-run, no longer fully reflects
Irish society. Even with their best efforts, many Church-run schools are struggling to fully meet the needs of all of their children due to the constraints of their ethos.

Who is the patron of these schools?

The patrons of CNS schools are the Education and Training Boards (ETBs). ETBs, which were formerly
known as VECs, are statutory authorities which have responsibility for education and youth work. ETBs
manage and operate Community National Schools, Second-level schools such as Community Colleges
and a range of adult and further education centres. They have developed an excellent reputation for
their provision of inclusive, innovative education that meets the needs of the entire community.

What is the difference between Community National Schools and other school types?

Faced with a number of choices, parents can be comforted knowing that every school, regardless of its
patron, follows the same national curriculum. Schools mainly differ in what they call their ‘ethos’ or
characteristic spirit. Many parents describe a Community National School as somewhere between the
traditional denominational school and a secular school. Although Community National Schools do
not prioritise any one religion over another, space is made within the school day for children to be
nurtured in their own faith or secular belief while learning more about their friends’ beliefs too.
Although CNS schools pride themselves on their commitment to inclusion and equality for all, their
main commitment is to providing a child-centred education that helps children to live their lives to
the full. A focus on both academic and hands-on learning, IT and the nurturing of children’s well-being
ensures that they are prepared to thrive in and beyond their education journey.
CNS schools are progressive schools rooted in the best of tradition. CNS schools are similar to traditional
schools in that the children wear a school uniform and the teacher is referred to formally e.g. Mr. Murphy, Múinteoir Orla.
Community National Schools Ethos
CNS schools are similar to Educate Together schools in that they have inclusive enrolment policies which do not prioritise any one group over another, are multi-denominational and have equality central to their ethos.
Unique to each school type is what is known as their ‘Patron’s Programme’. This is done for 30 minutes a day and underpins the ethos of the school. In a Church-run school, it is a single faith formation programme. However, in a Community National School, it is a multi-belief and values education
programme called Goodness Me! Goodness You!

How do Community National Schools cater for religious/secular belief diversity?

Unlike single-denominational schools, Community National Schools have a multi-belief and values education programme that caters for children of all faiths and secular beliefs. The programme is called Goodness Me, Goodness You! or GMGY. This programme was developed by the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) which is the statutory body charged with the development of national curricula.

It is a belief-nurturing programme where children, with the help of their teacher, parents and belief
communities learn more about their own beliefs and those of their friends. Children learn together about
the same theme – the schools communicate with parents about the theme and they talk about it at home from their own faith/belief perspective. Children then share their perspective or experience of the same theme with their class and therefore learn more about themselves and each other.

Does the school support children preparing for special rites of passages e.g. the Sacraments?

Community National Schools also offer Belief Specific Teaching (BST) where parents can request additional supports around specific rites of passage. For example, many Catholic parents want some support from the school around the sacraments. The schools work with the parents and parish around how they can support them, bearing in mind the limitations they have as they are primarily multi-denominational schools. This support is open to all families from all religions and beliefs. It is different
in every Community National School, depending on the needs of the school community and the practices
of local belief communities.

Does the GMGY Programme deal with topics other than religions and beliefs?

The GMGY programme is also a values education programme. Children learn all about ethics and
the values of the school, such as equality and justice. They also do what is called ‘Thinking Time’
where the children learn to think critically and philosophically about different issues. A very nice part of
the programme is what is known as ‘Quiet Time’ where children are encouraged to fall still and think
about all that they have learnt that day in GMGY and to consider how that relates to their lives as
individuals.

Where are the current Community National Schools and how are they doing?

To date, there are 11 Community National Schools in Dublin, Wicklow, Meath, Kildare and Cork. Each CNS has thrived in the areas they are in and have developed reputations for their inclusive ethos and commitment to excellence in education.

Where can I find out more information about these schools?

For more information or to express an interest in enrolling your child in a new Community National School, please visit www.cns.ie. Each school has its own individual website that can be accessed from here. For more information on Goodness Me! Goodness You! please visit www.gmgy.ie.

DDLETB-Awarded-Patronage-of-two-schools-in-swords

DDLETB awarded patronage of two new primary schools for Swords, Co. Dublin

DDLETB has been awarded patronage of two new primary schools planned to open in September 2019 in Swords.

The Department of Education and Skills has informed DDLETB that the Swords community has endorsed our state-run Community National School model. The planned new schools for Swords are scheduled to open in September 2019 and DDLETB expects that the Principals will be appointed shortly to lead the new schools.

Paddy Lavelle, Chief Executive of DDLETB said, “This is a very positive development for Swords. The new schools will join six other Community National Schools under our patronage. We see the results of this campaign as a welcome endorsement, from parents and families, for ETB run schools and the Community National School model. “We ran a highly visible and engaging campaign in Swords. Parents clearly supported our vision for child-centred, multidenominational, publicly-accountable schools which strive to provide high-quality education for all learners. They give equal opportunities to all children,” added Lavelle.”

“The new schools in Swords will be technologically advanced using the latest Information and communication technologies. These new schools will further embed our presence on the educational landscape especially in the North-Dublin region,” said Adrian Flynn, Director of Schools with DDLETB.“Our vision is to continue to develop teaching and learning communities that lead
educational thinking both nationally and internationally. We are excited about our shared future with new learners and teachers in Swords. We are now taking this message to Citywest/Saggart, Blanchardstown and Goatstown/Stillorgan for our 2020 post-primary patronage campaign” added Flynn.

Dublin and Dún Laoghaire ETB has been at the forefront of the development of Community National Schools as state-run multi-denominational schools since the first one opened its doors in 2008 and has more than 100 years’ experience as an educational patron in Ireland.

Community-National-School-Kids

Register Your Interest For A New School In Your Community

Community National School KidsWe are currently seeking expressions of interest from parents or guardians who would like to have a Community National School in their area.

To show your interest, please fill in this short survey form here on the Community National School website.

The results of the survey will be used to provide information to the Department of Education and Skills when they are determining which patron would be most suitable to serve a particular area. We would love for that Patron to be the DDLETB.

Please note that if a Community National School does open in your area, parents/guardians will have to fill in a separate application form for this school as this survey is an expression of interest only.